Thinking about Action Forms

From Aic-background

Jump to: navigation, search

The Action Form

The action form is used when a team wishes to impose an action in the game like a potential cease fire, movement of troops or even a suicide bombing. The reason for wanting to carry out an action must be viable and flow with the direction in which the simulation is going.

The action form must be formulated by completely considering the consequences that the action will have on the simulation including the reactions of other countries and potential backlash on your own country.

In order to successfully complete an action form, you must present four different well thought-out plans of how the action could happen and the likelihood of success in each case. In planning an action form a team must formulate a cost-benefit analysis of completing the action. The consequences of failure should be considered as well.

Action forms should be posted by one member of the team via his or her action desk. An action form can be viewed only by the mentor, NSA, and the character posting it.

It is the job of the mentor to approve these action forms, working in concert with the NSA for that team, and the entire mentor group.

Once an action form is submitted into the game, the game mentor will announce the action through a News Flash update in which all teams will be told about the event.


An Action Form must provide all of the 14 pieces of information requested below, each preceded by the appropriate Roman numeral indicating the heading:


Indicate Name of Team and Role Initiating the Action Form:


I. Concern to be addressed or Event to be reacted to:

WHAT ARE THE MAIN OPTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN CONSIDERED IN ADDRESSING THIS MATTER?

II. Option: DO NOTHING A. Likelihood of success:

B. Positive Outcomes:

C. Negative Outcomes:

D. Principal proponent (Role(s) on your team):

E. Principal opponent (Role(s) on your team):


III. Option: A. Likelihood of success:

B. Positive Outcomes:

C. Negative Outcomes:

D. Principal proponent (Role(s) on your team):

E. Principal opponent (Role(s) on your team):


IV. Option: A. Likelihood of success:

B. Positive Outcomes:

C. Negative Outcomes:

D. Principal proponent (Role(s) on your team):

E. Principal opponent (Role(s) on your team):


V. Option: A. Likelihood of success:

B. Positive Outcomes:

C. Negative Outcomes:

D. Principal proponent (Role(s) on your team):

E. Principal opponent (Role(s) on your team):


VI. ACTION to be taken (from those listed above):


VII. REASONS this option was decided upon:


VIII. METHODS used:


IX. Probability of action being undertaken "realistically." (1-very low; 2-low; 3-fifty-fifty; 4-great; 5-very great; 6-certain.) (specify which number)


X. Outcomes to be achieved by success:


XI. COSTS you are prepared to incur to achieve these outcomes: (Note: Costs include political or military, as well as financial, economic and other consequences.)


XII. Probability of action being successful: (1-very low; 2-low; 3-fifty-fifty; 4-great; 5-very great; 6-certain.) (specify which number)


XIII. Consequences of failure:


XIV. Facilitator's reaction:


Finally, here's a little inside information from a Game Mentor: “Many of the students do not seem to take the consequences of their actions very seriously. Many seem to feel that it is just another step in filling out the action form, especially since it is at the end of the form. Most of the time the students will simply put in an obvious answer and it is the mentor’s job to push them to think deeper about the long term ramifications for their group or country of whatever action they plan to take.” (Phil Koch)

Personal tools